Equipment Appraisal Blog | Understanding Machinery Appraisals

Used Equipment Listings vs. Public Sales Databases

Posted by Equipment Appraisal Services on Mon, Jul 11, 2022 @ 07:30 AM

 

Machinery Equipment Appraisal Public Database Equipment Listing

Equipment appraisers are sometimes asked which is the better source for researching used machinery market activity: current listings or public databases which reflect recent historic sales.

The answer is that both sources are very useful, and should be considered wherever possible, to create a balanced perspective when valuing machinery & equipment. Each has its pros and cons which need to be understood in order to reach the most reasonable conclusion when weighing the data. Experienced M&E appraisers know that taking any particular source of information at 100% face value, without the broader context of related data and approaches can lead to poor results.

Here are a few additional insights to consider when reviewing both used equipment listings and sales databases:

Equipment Listings for Sale

When appraisers are able to locate a significant amount of available listings for the assets they are researching, it may seem only logical that this would be the best source of information, given it is coming directly from an active secondary market. That may be true up to a point, however, you need to qualify these listings and consider only those that come from valid resellers, and are not priced out of any reasonable range of value. Even when you narrow these down in this way, you should also consider discounting the listing price to reflect what would typically be realized with a final sale. It is common practice for used equipment dealers to price their machines over fair market value, to allow room for negotiating.

Other things to consider would be location; how long the machine has been for sale; how many similar items are available; if it is refurbished and being sold with a new short-term warranty.

Machinery Sales Databases

Historic sales databases can be found either through annual subscription providers or in the public domain and can include both dealer and auction-level activity. The key thing to keep in mind with this information is that it can be based on very small samples or, on the flip side, consider too broad of a market, which in both cases can skew the results.

Some of these databases can be a good source to confirm the new cost, year, make, and model of the assets being appraised, as well as capacity specifications. Certain databases also attempt to create estimated values for the machinery over time, which is useful when forecasting future values with used equipment. That said, it is prudent to consider if the data makes sense in the context of the other sources you are researching and relying on.

In summary, both of these types of market data should be researched and considered when available to an appraiser. They should always use their judgment based on the reliability of the information, in the broader context of their experience and overall approach, to reach a reasonable conclusion of value when completing a machinery & equipment appraisal.

Tags: used equipment values, Machinery & Equipment Appraisals, public sales databases, used equipment listings

Equipment Appraisers vs. Used Equipment Resellers Explained

Posted by Equipment Appraisal Services on Mon, Jun 13, 2022 @ 07:30 AM

 

Machinery and Equipment Used Appraisers vs Dealers

There are times when used equipment dealers and resellers are asked to provide estimated values for the types of machinery they sell. Alternately, independent equipment appraisers have clients who wish to market their assets for sale, while asking the appraiser if they have experience liquidating the M&E they value. There are both similarities and differences between independent machinery & equipment appraisers and used equipment resellers, which creates a fine line between the two that should never be crossed.

When researching market values, equipment appraisers will contact used machinery dealers in the relevant industry, such as earthmoving, truck transportation, or parts manufacturing, to name a few. These vendors can provide insightful data to the appraiser, specific to the makes and model types they sell, which becomes one of several sources relied upon during the valuation analysis.

Equipment dealers often provide their clients with estimates of value prior to engaging in a resale effort, to assure them of their experience and to manage expectations for the eventual prices realized at sale. Both appraisers and resellers are continually crossing paths in the used equipment marketplace, even though their primary focus is quite different.

Here are some other distinctions to consider:

An accredited appraisal is an independent, unbiased opinion of value based on a blend of approaches and methodologies which, in part, consider the opinions of certain used equipment dealers. An experienced equipment appraiser will consider multiple sources before ultimately concluding on a value opinion.

This opinion is not a guarantee of a sale price outcome and the information they receive from equipment dealers will be subjectively weighed, depending on the rest of the information they gather. Equipment appraisers typically have a broad degree of experience in many distinct markets and industries, directly tied to their client’s businesses.

A used equipment dealer, on the other hand, will usually focus on a particular market, and more specifically, certain makes and models of machinery with which they have built their support and credibility over the years. These dealers will have a significant amount of expertise in these more refined areas but their primary goal is in the sale of equipment. While they understand value as a result of this experience, they are not considered independent or accredited appraisers. There may even be some level of bias in their opinions, given their ma objective is to sell, not appraise.

In summary, appraisers and used equipment resellers are quite different in their overall skill sets, however, the markets they work in often overlap. It’s prudent to understand the distinctions of each, so you can create the most beneficial team around you when it is time to consider buying, selling, or financing your machinery & equipment.

Tags: accredited appraisers, used equipment values, Machinery & Equipment Appraisals, used equipment dealers

Used Equipment Values: Making Sense of the Data

Posted by Equipment Appraisal Services on Mon, Jan 10, 2022 @ 07:00 AM

Machinery Equipment Appraiser Appraisal Value Used

There will come a time when your business or individual practice will need to appraise your used equipment. You may have a desire to sell and replace with newer machinery, refinance an existing inventory, seek new investors, settle an estate or transfer the assets of the business into a new entity. Depending on the type of equipment you own and operate, the amount of data available to review in the marketplace will range from overwhelming to non-existent

The most difficult step in the process of estimating used equipment value is making sense of the information you uncover, or lack thereof. For commonly resold assets such as construction equipment, trucks, and forklifts, you can find many similar comparisons in the market, however, the range in pricing can vary greatly. On the other hand, if you own a specialized piece of machinery that is customized to your specific operational needs, the resale market will not be the best place to search for information.

Equipment appraisers face these challenges every day, which is an excellent reason to consider engaging with an experienced, accredited valuation expert to assist in this effort. Over time, a seasoned appraiser will have developed sound strategies to reasonably determine value regardless of the type of assets you own. In the meantime, here are a few tips that can help you along the way:

Consider Multiple Sources

It’s not uncommon to see used equipment with the same year, make and model selling for vastly different prices in the marketplace at the same time. This could be due to any number of variables such as condition, hours/mileage, location, and recent refurbishments being completed. Oftentimes it's simply because dealers are testing the waters to see if they can obtain an inflated price given no immediate concern to sell. With all these factors at play, it is difficult to make sense of the varying data.

It’s important to investigate as many distinct sources as you believe reasonable and see if you can determine patterns that will allow you to better value your equipment.

Look at Multiple Perspectives

Given the inconsistent data found in the marketplace, alternate perspectives can bring the valuation process into better focus. Research what you paid for the equipment when you originally purchased it and consider the history of your usage and time since it was acquired. Determine what you believe to be a reasonable useful life for that equipment along with typical levels of depreciation that make sense in the context of your experiences as an owner-operator.

Finally, consider contacting your local equipment vendor to discuss what similar new equipment is selling for and gather their opinions on the current market.

Recognize the Specific Premise of Value You Need to Measure

Appraisers can provide estimates of value at different market levels, and your situation may fall into one or another, as you determine the need to sell. If you are in a hurry to turn your assets into cash, or just don’t have a lot of time to market your equipment, consider an Orderly or Forced Liquidation. If you are selling the assets as part of a larger transaction and the purchaser will be taking over some or all of your operation, then Fair Market Value is realistic, with consideration for applicable installation costs and related expenses to bring the equipment into operation.

In summary, it is always a good idea to consider bringing in an experienced appraiser to help you through this analysis who can develop an independent, unbiased process that will be supported by one or all of these methodologies.

Tags: machinery valuation, used equipment, used equipment values, equipment valuation, Machinery & Equipment Appraisals, used machinery

How do you accurately determine used equipment values?

Posted by Equipment Appraisal Services on Tue, Sep 18, 2018 @ 02:13 PM

When you have used machinery, how do you figure out what it's worth? You have a few different options available, but only one really solid one. Used equipment values can vary widely, with a number of different sources, but how do you make sure that your equipment value is as accurate as possible? Here's a quick look at different ways you can have your equipment valued, along with the benefits and drawbacks of each method.

How do you accurately determine used equipment values?

So what are the different ways you can have your equipment valued? You could take a good look through online or live auctions, classified ads, magazines or similar markets to see if you could find the same or similar equipment. You could talk to your local dealer and find out how much they would give you for the equipment on trade. You could pay to an equipment appraiser to determine the value of your equipment. Though each of these approaches would give you a value for your equipment, only one of these would be accurate.

Equipment that is being offered for sale is priced based on how quickly the seller wants to move the equipment. If they're going for a quick sale, they may try to low ball the price or put on a fast paint job to hide years of abuse. If they're really not that enthused about trying to get rid of the equipment, they may price it high so that they're only getting rid of it for the price they want.

A dealer may offer you a price based on whether they need to sell new equipment or want to deal with the hassle of trading in used equipment. If they need to make a sale to improve their commissions for the month, they may offer you a much higher value than your equipment is really worth. If, on the other hand, they have a decent paycheck coming up and don't want to deal with the hassle of handling your used equipment, they may offer you significantly lower than it's actually worth.

Though you need to pay for an equipment appraisal, it actually provides you with the most value. An equipment appraiser deals with similar machinery every day can tell what kind of condition your machinery is in, and may even be able to recommend repairs to help improve the value. They take into account your industry's current condition, helping you determine whether you should sell your equipment outside of your region due to a localized slump. The valuation report they produce uses standardized methodologies to determine the value of your machinery, which means it will stand up well to very strong scrutiny if you're getting a loan or facing an insurance loss, incorrect tax assessment or a lawsuit.

Though there are a number of different ways you can calculate used equipment values, getting the accuracy you need for most purposes can only be found when you work with a certified equipment appraiser. Because of their level of training, expertise and experience, certified appraisers are able to calculate values and produce valuation reports that stand up well to the strongest of scrutiny, including legal, financial, insurance and tax agency circles. Working with a certified appraiser is the best way to ensure you're getting your money's worth out of your equipment valuation.

Tags: used equipment values