Equipment Appraisal Blog | Understanding Machinery Appraisals

What Do the Premises of Value Mean in the Resale Marketplace?

Posted by Equipment Appraisal Services on Mon, Oct 19, 2020 @ 08:00 AM

used-cars-premise-of-value

 

In our last blog post, we discussed Fair Market Value and its translation in the resale marketplace. The example we used was the sale of a used vehicle (car, pickup, SUV). For this week’s post, we will discuss the two liquidation value premises using the same example.

As a refresher, here are the two premises of value and their ASA definitions:

Orderly Liquidation Value

Orderly Liquidation Value is an opinion of the gross amount, expressed in terms of money, that typically could be realized from a liquidation sale, given a reasonable period of time to find a purchaser (or purchasers), with the seller being compelled to sell on an as-is, where-is basis, as of a specific date.

Forced Liquidation Value

Forced Liquidation Value is an opinion of the gross amount, expressed in terms of money, that typically could be realized from a properly advertised and conducted public auction, with the seller being compelled to sell with a sense of immediacy on an as-is, where-is basis, as of a specific date.

Orderly Liquidation Value would roughly translate to a trade-in value at your local dealership with the assumption that you are going to purchase another vehicle with that same dealer. There is enough incentive for the dealer to offer you a decent price given the new business aspect and the dealer’s need to make a profit margin on their ultimate resale of that asset.

The overall value and demand in the market for that particular vehicle will help determine how big that spread is. You will typically see a range of 20-40% between Fair Market Value and Orderly Liquidation depending on those factors. If a dealer has an immediate buyer for a high priced vehicle you are trading in, then the differential will be in the lower end of the range. If it is an older, less valuable vehicle with no resale timeline determined by the dealer, you can expect less of a trade in value in relation to the retail price.

Forced Liquidation Value, by its very definition, translates to an auction level which is generally considered the lowest value of a vehicle given the immediate need or compulsion to sell the vehicle as quickly as possible. You are essentially sacrificing dollars for time in these instances. The only lower levels of value used in appraisals are salvage (parts) and scrap.

The auction resale marketplace is very active in certain industries such as automobiles, trucks, trailers construction and standard metal working equipment. As a result, the levels of resale tend to be somewhat higher than if you were to try to auction equipment in a more confined industry with a limited number of potential buyers.

In summary, these different premises of value will produce a broad range of figures when considering all three in an appraisal assignment. Which ones are most appropriate for your business can be reviewed and discussed with an accredited appraiser prior to the actual valuation.

Tags: forced liquidation value, orderly liquidation value, Premise of Value

What Do the Premises of Value Mean in the Resale Marketplace?

Posted by Equipment Appraisal Services on Mon, Oct 05, 2020 @ 08:00 AM

premise-of-values

 

An ASA accredited equipment appraiser most often uses one or a combination of the following premises of value in their reports:

  • Fair Market Value
  • Orderly Liquidation Value
  • Forced Liquidation Value

These terms are formally defined by the American Society of Appraisers (ASA) as follows:

Fair Market Value

Fair Market Value is an opinion expressed in terms of money, at which the property would change hands between a willing buyer and a willing seller, neither being under any compulsion to buy or to sell and both having reasonable knowledge of relevant facts, as of a specific date.

Orderly Liquidation Value

Orderly Liquidation Value is an opinion of the gross amount, expressed in terms of money, that typically could be realized from a liquidation sale, given a reasonable period of time to find a purchaser (or purchasers), with the seller being compelled to sell on an as-is, where-is basis, as of a specific date.

Forced Liquidation Value

Forced Liquidation Value is an opinion of the gross amount, expressed in terms of money, that typically could be realized from a properly advertised and conducted public auction, with the seller being compelled to sell with a sense of immediacy on an as-is, where-is basis, as of a specific date.

We are often asked how these definitions translate to the actual marketplace where the buying and selling occurs every day. To facilitate a response to this question, we will consider selling your used vehicle (car, pickup SUV) when it is determined you need to replace it. We will begin with the Fair Market Value premise.

Fair Market Value is considered the higher end of the value spectrum and can be considered comparable to a private party sale where you, as the owner of the vehicle, put an ad online or in a local paper in an attempt to sell to another private party. The key assumption here is that there is no immediate sense of having to sell or purchase and the sale is on an “as-is where is” basis with no warranty or other conditions of sale.

The ability to obtain Fair Market Value is more realistic if you are in the business of buying, selling, leasing or operating equipment in the applicable industry. That is why new and used equipment dealers will typically be a good source to best understand this “retail” level of value.

To summarize, fair market value while being an accepted level of pricing in an equipment resale effort, many businesses such as banks and other investors look to liquidation values as a more attainable figure in a typical resale scenario.

In our next blog post we will cover the two types of liquidation values as they relate to the sale of your used vehicle.

Tags: fair market value, forced liquidation value, orderly liquidation value, Premise of Value

The Importance of a Precious Metals Mining Equipment Appraisal

Posted by Equipment Appraisal Services on Mon, Sep 21, 2020 @ 08:00 AM

precious metals mining equipment appraisal

The value of precious metals has often reaped the benefits within unstable currency markets. Given the state of the current US economy in these uncertain times, many precious metals are trending upward in 2020. Gold and silver mining facilities are the most common, however, this industry includes other types of mines such as rhodium, palladium and platinum, which drive the precious metals markets on a day to day basis.

For businesses owners involved in the mining of these metals who may be considering selling in a strong market or expanding their capabilities by raising new capital, it is important to consider a current appraisal of the machinery & equipment working every day to keep your company operational.

An accredited ASA (American Society of Appraisers) appraiser will provide a detailed valuation of your tangible mining assets, including drills, high wall miners, draglines, shovels/excavators, loaders, haul trucks and any other support items involved in the day to day running of the operation.

At Equipment Appraisal Services we can complete an on-site visual inspection of the equipment or a “desktop” valuation based the descriptions and photographs you provide directly to us. We will thoroughly research the market and complete a detailed valuation to assist you when making important business or investment decisions.Our experienced, accredited appraisers have been completing these types of fully researched valuations for decades and can meet the demands of any machinery & equipment appraisal assignment across all markets & industries.

Tags: precious metals mining equipment appraisal

Why Appraise Restaurant FF&E (Furniture, Fixtures & Equipment)?

Posted by Equipment Appraisal Services on Mon, Sep 07, 2020 @ 08:00 AM

restaurant FF&E appraisal

The restaurant industry has certainly been one of the top business segments to suffer during the COVID-19 pandemic over the last six months, with indoor dining options still not allowed in certain locations and most others facing limited capacity with stringent and costly guidelines to adhere to.

If you are a restaurant owner thinking of selling or are considering investing in one knowing the market will eventually open up again, you will need to make a sound decision armed with as much ammunition as possible. Part of your arsenal should include a current market appraisal of the furniture, fixtures and equipment, commonly referred to as FF&E.

An accredited ASA (American Society of Appraisers) appraiser will provide a detailed valuation including the kitchen equipment, bar and seating area assets and any other supporting tangible items involved in the day to day running of the restaurant. An appraisal can be completed as an on-site visual inspection of the equipment or as a “desktop” valuation based on the descriptions and photographs you provide to the appraiser.

Whichever direction you’re heading, Equipment Appraisal Services can assist you in the process and provide an independent opinion of value which can help form a realistic purchase or sale price for the business, and support the information needed to potential investors, financial institutions, insurance companies and other parties involved in the project. Our experienced, accredited appraisers have been completing these types of fully researched valuations for decades and have the depth of knowledge and experience to meet the demand of today's challenging market.

Tags: restaurant FF&E appraisal

Why Do You Need A Machinery & Equipment Appraisal?

Posted by Equipment Appraisal Services on Mon, Aug 24, 2020 @ 08:00 AM

Importance of machinery & equipment appraisal

Whether your business is expanding or going through a downturn, being purchased or sold, audited or invested in, refinanced or liquidated, it is important to understand the real market value of your tangible assets, specifically the machinery & equipment that work every day behind the scenes.

Obtaining an equipment appraisal from a qualified valuation firm such as Equipment Appraisal Services can provide you with firsthand knowledge of the value of your machinery and what to expect should you wish to buy, sell, refinance or upgrade these types of assets in the resale marketplace. A formal appraisal analysis and report can assist you in any number of ways as you move through the next phases of your company’s development and can be shared with third parties who may be assisting you with these project plans.

Our appraisers can visit your operations facility and perform an on-site personal inspection and discuss your business directly or complete a “desktop” appraisal based on the information you provide to us, including detailed asset listings and photographs.

The experienced appraisers at Equipment Appraisal Services have been completing these types of fully researched valuations for decades and can meet the demands of any machinery & equipment appraisal assignment across all markets & industries. We look forward to the opportunity to work with you as a key component to your ongoing business projects.

Tags: Machinery & Equipment Appraisals, Equipment Appraisal Services, Tangible Assets

Machinery & Equipment Appraisals: Blending The Best of Both Approaches

Posted by Equipment Appraisal Services on Mon, Aug 10, 2020 @ 08:00 AM

machinery & equipment appraisal blending approaches

Machinery & Equipment appraisers know from experience that the overwhelming majority of their valuations involves the Sales Comparison (Market) and/or Cost Approaches to value. The income approach is primarily utilized for business appraisals with a few exceptions which allow the tangible equipment to be valued as independently income driven assets.

The challenge becomes which of the two approaches makes the most sense given the scope of work, premise of value and overall perspective of the project involved. Based on our experience at Equipment Appraisal Services, we have found that regardless of the above variables, relying on components of both the Sales Comparison Approach (commonly referred to as the “Market Approach”) and the Cost Approach for each valuation project produce the most credible, realistic and supportable results.

Under the Sales Comparison Approach, researching and properly interpreting the available data in the marketplace for assets very similar to those being appraised is critical to the analysis. Understanding the nuances between asking prices, recent listings, opinions of resale value and the market level at which the machines are traded are all important to the appraisal process.

With the Cost Approach, deriving the data pertaining to replacement cost new, useful life and depreciation should come directly from the specific markets and industries in which the assets are working in. Gathering new pricing information for the make and model of the machinery, along with opinions from third parties who buy and sell these assets is far more reliable than broad multi-industry trends and straight line depreciation.

The experienced appraisers at Equipment Appraisal Services have been completing these types of fully researched valuations for decades and can meet the demands of any machinery & equipment appraisal assignment across all markets & industries. We look forward to the opportunity to work with you as a key component to your ongoing business projects.

Tags: Machinery & Equipment Appraisals, Approaches

What Kind of Equipment is Covered in a Marine Vessel Appraisal?

Posted by Equipment Appraisal Services on Mon, Jul 27, 2020 @ 08:00 AM

Trade boat at the port of Miami
Barges, boats, resupply, tugs: whatever kind of vessels you run, have you considered the value of a marine vessel appraisal to your overall operation? Though many business and equipment owners have a vague idea of the value of their marine equipment, having a professional appraisal performed is often overlooked until it's time to sell equipment. But what kind of marine equipment is typically covered during this type of appraisal? The answer may surprise you. Here's a quick overview of what machinery is covered in the process.

 

What Kind of Equipment is Covered in a Marine Vessel Appraisal? 

 

  • Inland Barges: Though much of the midwest and west was settled because of river traffic, many people don't consider this type of transport anymore, despite its function to keep things moving that would otherwise be prohibitively expensive, such as aggregate, sand, grain, trash, oil, timber, metal ores or other bulky, heavy goods, providing a much-needed, inexpensive option to move these materials to market.
  • Offshore Barges: Rivers aren't the only places that you'll see barges moving materials, though offshore barges tend to be larger and with more displacement than their smaller riverboat counterparts. Offshore barges are able to move a wide range of materials between points on the shoreline, without going further afield in many cases due to rougher weather and waterways that may be found further from the coast. At the same time, their smaller engines help provide a more economic option for moving bulk goods.
  • Tugboats and Pushboats: Whether it's pulling barges off of sandbars or similar obstructions, getting large ships safely out to sea before their main engines are engaged, shuttling barges at a loading station or any number of other circumstances, tugboats and pushboats are powerful marine vessels that do a wonderful job of getting much larger ships underway, typically sticking closer to shore for the majority of the time to avoid choppier waters further out to sea.
  • Hopper Barges: When large amounts of material must be moved, unpowered hopper barges are often chained together, creating a waterborne train of material. This provides the option to move large amounts of material without having to have numerous navigators or crews manning the different vessels, as one is simply pulled along behind the other. This allows a single crew to pull thousands of tons of material along a set course without a lot of extra manpower.
  • Oilfield Support Vessels: Offshore oil platforms and drilling rigs need a wide range of materials, changes in crew, new parts for the rig and a number of other items that have to be exchanged at a dizzying rate. Food, medicine, protective equipment, pipeline, couplers, experts, oncoming and offboarding crew members and a wide range of other people and items are carried by oilfield support vessels, providing an inexpensive alternative to spendy helicopter rides for many petroleum companies.

By having a marine vessel appraisal performed on your equipment, you can gain valuable insights into its condition, expected useful lifespan and several other important pieces of information that will help you better manage your equipment assets. However, it's of vital importance that you have the appraisal performed by an accredited equipment appraiser, who will provide you with a properly calculated estimate of your marine assets' value.

Tags: Marine Vessel Valuation

What Happens During an Oil & Gas Pipeline Equipment Valuation?

Posted by Equipment Appraisal Services on Mon, Jul 13, 2020 @ 08:00 AM

close up of industrial pipes of oil industry production
When your daily operation keeps you focused on moving crude oil, natural gas and other petroleum products to your customers, you know that you need to keep your pipeline operating at peak efficiency. A breakdown can cause serious problems for your company. But have you considered the value of that equipment? If you've wondered what happens during an oil & gas pipeline equipment valuation, here's a quick explanation of the process.

What Happens During an Oil & Gas Pipeline Equipment Valuation?

When your oil & gas pipeline equipment is appraised by an accredited equipment appraiser, there are a number of steps taken to ensure the value that is estimated is accurate to your specific equipment's capabilities and condition. These steps help the appraiser compare your equipment to similar machinery in the industry and estimate a fair value based on this information. But what kind of equipment is appraised? In addition to the pipeline itself, the appraiser will also look at components such as control valves, tanks, wellheads, pumps, rods, vertical separators, and, virtually every piece of equipment that is part of your pipeline. If you have computers that are used in monitoring your pipeline status, if you have heavy equipment for maintenance and repairs, if you have emergency response equipment for dealing with these types of events all of these assets can be appraised as part of your overall equipment base, ensuring that you have a complete estimate of value. The appraiser will look at the specific manufacturers and models for each item, as well as its age and condition.

They will also look at the overall demand for that type of equipment, which can impact value, as well as how well the equipment has been maintained and repaired over the years. All of these factors will be taken into account when estimating value. If a piece of equipment has been well-cared for, it will have a materially higher value than one that has been abused or left without proper maintenance. This is all reflected in the appraiser's analysis. If the market for pipeline equipment is especially active, such as when the Bakken oil formation took off a decade or so ago, that demand will be reflected in the value of your equipment. If the industry is going through a slump due to lower oil prices, demand for that equipment may decrease, which will also be reflected in your asset value. Many factors feed into estimating machinery value, which all must be taken into account by an accredited equipment appraiser.

By having an oil & gas pipeline equipment valuation performed on your petroleum product machinery, you'll have a better idea of what it's worth, how long you can expect it to continue to operate economically, and an understanding of it's overall condition and demand in the industry as a whole. This provides you with valuable insights to help you better manage your oil & gas pipeline business effectively and efficiently, making it less risky to make important decisions when opportunities present themselves to your business for solid growth.

Tags: Oil & Gas Pipeline Equipment Appraisal

What Kind of Equipment is Evaluated During a Graphic Arts Printing Equipment Appraisal?

Posted by Equipment Appraisal Services on Mon, Jun 29, 2020 @ 08:00 AM

Man in printing house showing client printed documents
Is printing and graphics a central concern of your business? If it is, the value of that equipment can make up a solid portion of your business' overall assets. However, that equipment is often misrepresented in terms of value in your balance sheet. Because this type of equipment often has a long lifespan, equipment depreciation rates used in tax tables may reduce your equipment's value to zero long before it has stopped providing value for your business. Here's a quick look at the kind of equipment you can get an estimate of value with during a graphic arts printing equipment appraisal.

What Kind of Equipment is Evaluated During a Graphic Arts Printing Equipment Appraisal?

  • Sheetfed Offset Presses: Used for a wide range of different printing purposes, sheetfed offset presses are often at the heart of businesses that provide a number of products in different sizes, including newspapers, advertisements, postcards and similar paper products. Because sheetfed offset presses deal better with this range of sizes, it provides superior flexibility in daily operations.
  • Web Presses: Producing documents using huge rolls of paper rather than individual sheets, web presses deliver efficiency and economy for many businesses, providing a better option for mass production operations. However, it represents a serious investment for many businesses, which can be rolled into your balance sheet for more accurate figures.
  • Pre-Press Equipment: From high-end computers that are designed to handle the burden of graphics design to the specialty equipment you use for providing proofs to clients prior to mass production, your pre-press equipment keeps orders rolling in without getting in the way of your mainstream operations.
  • Bindery Equipment: As anyone in the business can tell you, what the product looks like on the press can be very different than the finished product. Folders, stitchers, trimmers and similar machinery help turn loose paper into a quality finished product, with sharp folds, quality binding and neat edges.
  • Materials Handling Equipment: When you need to move pallets of paper or other material to keep your presses rolling, the equipment you use in this process is the lifeblood of your business, keeping things from grinding to a halt when a new shipment arrives or a machine needs to be replenished to continue getting the job done.
  • Shipping Equipment: Unless you run a local-only shop, you're probably going to have to ship your products to your customers. Whether it's shipping scales, conveyor belts, packaging machinery or similar equipment, being able to get your finished product boxed and out the door helps keep your workspace free for operational purposes.
By having a graphic arts printing equipment appraisal performed on your business, you can ensure that you have an accurate estimate of the value of your business assets, giving you a more accurate balance sheet. When presented in an appraisal report from an accredited equipment appraiser, you can use this information to help in a range of different situations, whether it's filing an insurance claim after an equipment fire, appealing a bad tax assessment or securing financing for growing your business.

Tags: printing equipment appraisal

What's Covered During a Family Entertainment Center Asset Valuation?

Posted by Equipment Appraisal Services on Mon, Jun 15, 2020 @ 08:00 AM

happy father and son playing driving wheel video game in playground theme park
When your life's work is based around providing an amazing place for families to have fun, your focus is on building your business and keeping people coming in the doors. But when you're focusing on growth, have you considered the value of your business assets into the equation? Whether you're considering upgrading your arcade games, adding some landscaping equipment to your fun farm or upgrading your cleaning equipment to keep things fresh and sparkling, knowing the value of your equipment can help you make smarter business decisions. Here's a look at the kind of equipment a family entertainment center asset valuation can cover.

What's Covered During a Family Entertainment Center Asset Valuation?

  • Games: Whether it's the machinery that is the backbone of your bowling alley, a few video games on the way through or a whole complex of carnival-style games, you've put a lot of money into these entertainment assets. An accredited equipment appraiser can properly calculate the estimated value of this equipment, making it easier to decide when it's time to replace a less-popular game or one that's beginning to show signs of aging.
  • Facility Maintenance Equipment: Keeping your facility clean and looking great is an important part of how your business is viewed in terms of public opinion, which in turn can drive more - or less - business in your direction. Knowing the value of steam cleaners, landscaping equipment or floor buffers allows you to get a fair deal when it's time to replace them for an upgraded model.
  • Kitchen Machinery: Maybe your business has a snack bar, or it could be a full-scale restaurant that feeds hungry families during a busy day of making memories. No matter the level of complexity or size, an equipment valuation can include your kitchen and restaurant equipment, making it easier to decide if it's time to switch out your soda fountain machinery or if you should focus on a new refrigerator instead.
  • Computers: If you're still working with an older system, you've probably considered whether it's time to change it out for a tablet-based system that provides more options. But how will you know when it's time to make the change based on your current system's value? Having an appraisal done will make it easier to decide, because you'll know what your current system will bring in when it's sold.
  • Security Assets: With the situations families can face these days and the lowering cost of security features, many family entertainment centers have added cameras, trackers and sensors to help keep their patrons of all ages safe and sound. But those assets have a value that can be leveraged when it's time to make upgrades to your facility. Knowing what those assets are worth can make it easier to document your company's value.
By having a family entertainment center asset valuation performed on your business' equipment, you can gain a much better idea of what your equipment is actually worth beyond simple, standardized tax depreciation. However, it's important that you work with an accredited equipment appraiser to ensure you're receiving an accurate estimate of your equipment's value from an independent third party. Make sure you ask your appraiser about their accreditation at the beginning to ensure you're getting your money's worth out of your appraisal.

Tags: family entertainment center asset appraisal